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June 24, 2021

News
UK Athletics Leaders Issue Statements on Gov. Beshear's Executive Order Regarding NIL

By UK Athletics June 24, 2021

**LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 24, 2021) — **The following are statements from University of Kentucky Athletics Director Mitch Barnhart, Kentucky men's basketball head coach John Calipari, Kentucky football head coach Mark Stoops and Kentucky women's basketball head coach Kyra Elzy regarding today's executive order by Gov. Andy Beshear on name, image, likeness.

Mitch Barnhart will also be available to the media via virtual press conference on Friday at 2 p.m. 

Mitch Barnhart, UK athletics director "Today's executive order from the Governor provides us the flexibility we need at this time to further develop policies around Name, Image and Likeness (NIL). We are appreciative of that support as it is a bridge until such time as state and/or federal laws are enacted. The landscape of college sports is now in the midst of dramatic and historic change — perhaps the biggest set of shifts and changes since scholarships were first awarded decades ago. What won't change is our core and most important principle — the well-being and development of our student athletes, while they are at UK and, as importantly, in preparing them for success in life, on whatever path they choose. We are extremely well-positioned to help our student-athletes navigate this new and complex terrain. Much of what we need to do to support students in terms of NIL — through The Kentucky Road initiative — has been in place for some time. We have a strong foundation, which we will now work to build on."

You can read more about The Kentucky Road initiative here: https://ukathletics.com/news/2019/10/15/general-uk-unveils-the-kentucky-road https://ukathletics.com/news/2021/6/16/general-uk-athletics-affirms-commitment-to-student-athletes-through-the-kentucky-road.aspx

John Calipari, UK men's basketball head coach "We are entering into an exciting age in college athletics. At the University of Kentucky, we have always put student-athletes first and today's executive order by Gov. Andy Beshear — who I want to thank for making this a priority — will empower universities across the state to support their young men and women better than ever. Whether we are talking about name, image and likeness, lifetime scholarships, financial literacy, health and wellness, or player welfare, student-athletes have been at the center of every decision at Kentucky. With today's announcement, we continue to take positive steps forward in supporting our student-athletes to an even greater degree statewide. They deserve our time, effort and resources in making sure they have the opportunities to benefit from the hard work they put into their athletic and educational careers. As we wait on federal legislation, our program will continue to support, elevate and educate our kids."

Mark Stoops, UK football head coach "Supporting our student-athletes is at the center of Kentucky Athletics and today's announcement is another step in that direction. Name, image and likeness issues are at the forefront of college athletics and we appreciate Gov. Beshear helping us address current needs while long-term solutions are being developed on the national level. Our established principles of educational excellence, athletic success and personal development have us well-positioned as the NIL process begins."

Kyra Elzy, UK women's basketball head coach "I appreciate Gov. Beshear stepping up and making student-athletes in the state of Kentucky a priority. The University of Kentucky has been a leader in name, image and likeness. I know our administration will work with the Governor's office to ensure that student-athletes in Kentucky will continue to take the necessary steps to stay atop of NIL issues."

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June 16, 2021

News
UK Budget Invests Heavily in People

By Jay Blanton June 16, 2021

**LEXINGTON, Ky. (June 16, 2021) — **University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto says UK’s mission is to advance Kentucky — its health and education, its economy and quality of life.

UK’s proposed $5.1 billion budget for fiscal year 2021-2022, which the Board of Trustees considers Thursday, honors that mission, Capilouto said, by investing heavily in the people who do the work that makes advancing Kentucky possible — the university’s faculty, staff and students.

“We have a special community, whose mission for more than 156 years has been to serve our state. It’s why we were created, and it’s the mission we seek to honor every day,” Capilouto said. “That vital work is only possible when we make college more affordable for students and families. It’s only possible when we invest in the people who do the teaching and research and provide the lifesaving care, which does so much to make our state stronger and healthier.”

To that end, Capilouto said that the proposed budget further invests in students and families by continuing historic steps to hold down the cost of a college education and in UK’s faculty and staff, with substantial measures to increase compensation and benefits.

Investing in Students and Families

The proposed budget would if approved by the Board:

  • Increase by only 1% tuition and mandatory fees for undergraduate and graduate students. For undergraduate students from Kentucky, that would result in tuition and fees equaling $6,305 in Fall 2021, up from $6,242 last year. It’s the second year in a row that tuition increases have been held to 1% — perhaps unprecedented in UK’s history. This also means that the four-year average for annual increases sits at 1.7%, notably lower than four-year U.S. inflation rate of nearly 2%.
  • **Invest $148 million in scholarships and financial aid that students don’t have to repay, more than double what was invested 10 years ago. **In fact, nearly 90% of UK’s in-state undergraduates receive scholarships or aid. On average, their out-of-pocket costs for tuition and fees last fall was $1,759. About half of UK’s in-state students graduate without debt and, of those who do, the average debt was less than $35,000.
  • Target scholarships and aid to students who need it most, those with unmet financial need. In Fall 2020, about 25% of undergraduates from Kentucky came from families where the median income was $23,346. Those students had no out-of-pocket costs for tuition and fees. They also were provided, through aid, more than $700 to cover other expenses. In fact, through the UK LEADS program, unmet financial need among UK students declined to a level last experienced four years ago.

Investing in UK’s People

The budget, if approved, would also:

  • Increase the minimum hourly rate to $15 by January — the fourth time in six years that rate has been increased.
  • Provide a $1,000 one-time payment to all full-time, regular, non-UK HealthCare employees (faculty and staff) in July and 2% merit pay increases in January — the ninth time in 11 years employees have received pay raises. As the UK HealthCare enterprise operates on a separate salary review cycle, decisions will be made this fall about UK HealthCare employee merit increases.
  • Return the 2-to-1 retirement match for UK employees that was temporarily reduced last year as the university managed a more than $72 million budget shortfall as part of managing financial challenges during the pandemic.
  • Create a new paid leave for staff of two weeks to care for new children and one week for parental care. Faculty leave is managed through a different process.
  • For staff in non-health care areas, this budget will extend the deadline to use accrued vacation time set to expire June 30, 2021, until March 31, 2022. For UK HealthCare employees, nonexempt staff may be paid for their vacation time set to expire on Sept. 30, 2021, per the existing UK HealthCare policy. Exempt staff may extend any vacation time set to expire on Sept. 30, 2021, until June 29, 2022. You can read more about vacation policies here: www.uky.edu/hr/news/roll-over-your-expiring-vacation. Faculty vacation is managed through a different process.                                                               

Breaking Down the UK Budget

Eric N. Monday, UK’s executive vice president for finance and administration, said the proposed budget of nearly $5.1 billion is the largest in the university’s history and is about $700 million more than last year. UK’s overall budget has grown by nearly 90% in the last 10 years, nearly double what it was in 2012.

Here’s how the component parts of the budget break down:

  • The increase in this year’s proposed budget is largely driven by the continued growth of UK HealthCare, which now represents nearly half of UK’s budget.
  • More than 61% of the budget — the hospital and clinical services, largely — must be used for designated purposes such as patient care.
  • Another 14% of the university’s budget is designated for specific purposes as well — restricted funds like research grants and contracts and auxiliary services which receive no money from the university’s general fund and generally fund themselves (like UK Athletics).
  • Finally, fund balances are non-recurring funds invested by the institution, which essentially represent the institution’s rainy-day fund for emergency uses and building projects. That’s nearly 8% of the budget.
  • What’s left is a little more than $840 million — the so-called undesignated fund or 17% of the budget — that is comprised of tuition dollars and support from the state. Those resources fund the daily operating expenses of the university: teaching and instruction; the salaries of employees on much of the campus; scholarships and financial aid; and utilities, among other things.

“When you think about your budget, it’s the best evidence of what you value,” Monday said. “It’s the best evidence of what you want to achieve, because it’s where one of the most precious resources — our funds, our students’ money, our state’s money — are invested. And the question is, what do you want to achieve? For this institution, as President Capilouto has said, we invest in our students and our people because that’s how we do the most to advance our state.”

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion four years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" three years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for five straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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April 1, 2021

News
Update on the State Budget

LEXINGTON, Ky. (April 1, 2021)  University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto sent an email to UK students, staff and faculty yesterday with an update on state legislative budget action regarding state funding for UK. Please see the email message below.

Dear Campus Community,

The 2021 session of the General Assembly officially came to an end late last night and with that legislators completed their work on a state budget for the coming fiscal year, which begins July 1.

For the University of Kentucky, the news is good, and we are deeply appreciative of the work of policymakers in continuing their commitment to higher education. Here are the details:

  • UK will receive $266.2 million next year — July 2021 through June 30, 2022 — from the state in support of the essential work we do. That amount includes $80.6 million for mandated programs such as extension services, the University Press and the Kentucky Cancer Registry and $1.3 million for debt service on $14 million of State Bonds to improve the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging/Neurosciences Facilities.
  • In addition to that base appropriation, policymakers have appropriated about a 2 percent increase — $17.3 million — toward a performance funding pool in which all state universities and KCTCS compete for funding. The performance funding program for the universities measures progress in critical areas such as the advancement of students toward degrees, credit hours earned, and bachelor’s degrees awarded to low-income and underrepresented minority students and bachelor’s degrees awarded in specific areas including Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Health (STEM+H).
  • UK also will receive additional investments in cancer and spinal cord and head injury research funding that will be split with the University of Louisville.

The investment in the state’s performance funding model is particularly noteworthy. UK has done exceptionally well under this model in recent years, and we anticipate that will continue this coming year. That performance is thanks solely to you: the work of our faculty, staff and students across the campus.

You’ve helped our students succeed and graduate at historically high levels. You’ve ensured that we are more diverse as a campus than at any time in our history. And you’ve worked to prepare our students for the jobs and work so critical to Kentucky’s present and future economy. That’s what the performance funding model rewards. And that is the exceptional performance, the result of hard and tireless work, that you sustain year in and year out.

Now, with the state budget for next year in place, we will begin the work of finalizing the university’s budget for next year, which our Board of Trustees will consider at its June meeting. We still have much to do, but we are optimistic about the continued progress we can make. We can accelerate as an institution as we emerge from the incredible challenges of the past year.

We can do this because of you. I want to, again, thank our policymakers for their continued commitment to this institution. And I want to thank you for all you do to make this community so vital to the state we are called to serve.

Thank you.

Eli Capilouto

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March 12, 2021

News
Fall 2021 Return to Normal Operations

LEXINGTON, Ky. (March 12, 2021) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto announced to the UK community today that plans are in progress to return to normal operations in the Fall 2021 semester.  Please see the message below.

Dear Campus,

For the past year, I’ve had the honor to witness our community meet this moment in profound ways.

Our heroes on the frontlines of this pandemic worked countless hours, devoting time otherwise dedicated to loved ones to combat this unforgiving disease. Our faculty and staff adjusted in admirable ways to continue fulfilling our sacred missions of education, research, service and care. Our students found new ways to learn and engage, discover and grow in an environment so different from what they anticipated when they imagined their time in college.

Because of your efforts – your commitment to this place and its compelling purpose—I'm excited to share with you some initial planning assumptions regarding a return to normal operations in the fall of 2021.

Throughout this process, we will lean on our START team, leveraging our world-class experts to ensure a safe transition and implementation of our plans to return to campus operations. They will help us create specific measures and guideposts to monitor our progress as we begin to look to this fall.

In-Person Classes

  • The in-person class experience is invaluable to this institution and the success of our students, allowing them to interact with our world-class faculty who are experts in their fields.
  • Therefore, we expect – and are planning for – 2021 classes to return to levels of in-person instruction in similar numbers to that of fall 2019 in terms of course delivery and attendance.
  • We already are planning for that return. And over the summer, we will finalize details and release a comprehensive plan for our return to more in-person instruction, even as we leverage the investments we have made in technology and online learning to enhance what we do and how we do it.

** On-Campus Work**

  • The university has established a Return-to-Work Committee with employees from across campus who are formulating a plan for our efforts to return to campus this fall.
  • While we still will offer flexibility to supervisors in determining remote work options for their respective units, we are prioritizing getting our employees back on campus so we can continue to fulfill our promise as Kentucky’s university. We are a residential research campus. It is part of what makes us distinctive and special. We must have the staff on campus to support that environment.
  • With more than 6 million square feet of new, modern and high-tech space constructed over the last 10 years, we have the capacity and quality of facilities to ensure an in-person learning and teaching experience for our students, faculty and staff in a safe and healthy environment.

Residential Living

  • The University of Kentucky is known for its transformative residential experience.
  • We’ve created state-of-the-art living and learning spaces that give our students opportunities for connection and engagement, such as our Gatton Student Center, The 90, Jacobs Science Building and new e-sports gaming lounge at The Cornerstone.
  • We are planning for a more robust residential experience, even as we will continue to be guided by the latest science and recommendations from our START team and the CDC.

We know that this past year has not been easy. But your hard work, your commitment to a safe and healthy community and the prospects of a campus that is vaccinated and protected make planning for a return to more normal operations possible.

After all, if I’ve learned anything from the past year, it’s that incredible things happen when we come together, united in a common purpose.

We can do this. We will do this. It’s who we are. It is what we do.

Thank you for being a community so dedicated to what is possible.

Eli Capilouto

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January 29, 2021

Press Release
UK HealthCare, King’s Daughters Announce Significant Partnership

ASHLAND, Ky. (Jan. 29, 2021) — King’s Daughters Health System and UK HealthCare, the clinical health care system of the University of Kentucky, announced today their intent to enter into a significant partnership that will create new opportunities for both organizations to better serve patients throughout Kentucky, southern Ohio and West Virginia.

The executive committee of UK’s Board of Trustees and King’s Daughters' Board of Directors endorsed the formation of the new joint venture partnership during special meetings this morning. It is anticipated that the final operational details of the partnership will be announced in early April.

A new governing group will be formed for the proposed joint venture with equal representation of both UK and KDHS. David Jones, current chair of King’s Daughters Board of Directors, will serve as chair of the new board. Kristie Whitlatch, RN, MSN, will continue in her role as president and chief executive officer of King’s Daughters. While Whitlatch will join the UK HealthCare management team, no additional changes in management, compensation, benefits or job responsibilities are anticipated at either UK HealthCare or KDHS.

“Our goal in entering into this partnership is to strengthen local healthcare,” Whitlatch said, “not just in Ashland and eastern Kentucky, but throughout the Commonwealth and beyond.” King’s Daughters has enjoyed a longstanding, positive relationship with UK HealthCare, Whitlatch noted, including an affiliation with UK’s Markey Cancer Center.

“This is a win-win situation for two strong organizations,” said Dr. Mark F. Newman, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “This partnership builds on our existing relationship and creates mutual alignment between our two organizations,” he said.

The partnership will provide expanded access to tertiary-level services for residents of Eastern Kentucky and southern Ohio, including access to UK HealthCare’s solid organ transplantation program, bone marrow transplantation and expand on the existing relationship between UK’s Markey Cancer Center and King’s Daughters, Dr. Newman noted.

“We are excited to begin working more closely with our friends at UK HealthCare and being able to provide even better care, greater access, and advanced technology to our communities through this partnership,” Whitlatch said.     

 To see the Approved Recommendation from the UK Board of Trustees Executive Committee, click HERE.                                                                                               

**About UK HealthCare: **UK HealthCare employs more than 9,000 people with 945 licensed beds at UK Chandler Hospital, UK Good Samaritan Hospital and UK Kentucky Children’s Hospital. It also includes UK Markey Cancer Center, Gill Heart and Vascular Institute, Kentucky Neurosciences Center and more than 150 outpatient clinics and services.

About King’s Daughters: King’s Daughters Health System (KDHS) is comprised of two acute-care facilities – 465 licensed beds in Ashland and an additional 10 licensed beds at King’s Daughters Medical Center Ohio, located in Portsmouth. It also includes a long-term care facility, five urgent care centers and more than 50 physician practices serving the tri-state area from locations throughout Eastern Kentucky and southern Ohio.

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January 21, 2021

Press Release
Harrison Street Forms JV With Greystar To Recapitalize University Of Kentucky On Campus Housing Public Private Partnership

HARRISON STREET FORMS JV WITH GREYSTAR TO RECAPITALIZE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY ON CAMPUS HOUSING PUBLIC PRIVATE PARTNERSHIP

Transaction Includes 6,850 Beds

CHICAGO –January 21, 2021 – Harrison Street, pursuing its P3 infrastructure strategy, has acquired a significant minority interest in a portfolio of on-campus housing at the University of Kentucky (“UK”) as part of a newly formed joint venture with Greystar Real Estate Partners, LLC ("Greystar"), a global leader in the investment, development and management of high-quality rental housing properties. The investment is structured under a Public-Private-Partnership (“P3”) model in which Greystar will continue the day-to-day operation and management of the project in a fully integrated collaborative arrangement with the University of Kentucky.

Comprised of 14 modern, LEED-Certified facilities across nine resident communities with an average age of five years, the investment includes 6,850 beds.  The project is heavily weighted toward single occupancy units with a low bed-bath ratio, which has allowed substantially normal operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The highly structured project is fully contracted with UK through co-terminous Ground Leases and Affiliation Agreements

Christopher Merrill, Harrison Street’s Co-Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, said, “UK launched this groundbreaking initiative in 2011, and it has since become a signature, landmark higher education P3 in the US.  This P3 partnership with Greystar and the University of Kentucky, a leading flagship public institution, reflects Harrison Street’s position as the partner of choice to colleges and universities in North America. We look forward to bringing our expertise in providing strategic capital to bear to ensure UK’s students have access to high-quality living arrangements that facilitate their academic experience on campus.” 

Bob Faith, Greystar Founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, said, “In 2011, Greystar (formerly Education Realty Trust) and the University of Kentucky embarked upon a historic multi-phased P3 partnership to replace dated on-campus student residences and dining halls. Following a successful decade in partnership, we are pleased to welcome Harrison Street to one of the premier P3 partnerships in the nation, as their capital resources and expertise will provide an undeniable benefit to the partnership and allow us to collectively further improve the student on-campus living experience.”

Harrison Street is a market leading private investor in the off-campus student housing market. In addition, it has invested $2.6 billion in public to private partnerships (“P3”) serving education, healthcare, and government users. The firm’s higher education P3 portfolio totals 14 colleges and universities and over $2.0 billion in AUM complimenting its off-campus portfolio at over 150 universities.

About Harrison Street

Harrison Street is one of the leading investment management firms exclusively focused on alternative real assets. Since inception in 2005, the firm has created a series of differentiated investment solutions focused on demographic-driven, needs-based assets. The firm has invested across senior housing, student housing, healthcare delivery, life sciences and storage real estate as well as social and utility infrastructure. Headquartered in Chicago with an office in London, the firm has more than 190-employees and approximately $32 billion in assets under management. Clients of the firm include a global institutional investor base domiciled in North America, Europe, Middle East, Asia and Latin America. Harrison Street has been awarded Best Places to Work by Pensions & Investments for the last seven consecutive years and was named 2019 North American Alternatives Investor of the Year by PERE. For more information, please visit www.harrisonst.com

About Greystar

Greystar is a leading, fully integrated real estate company offering expertise in investment management, development, and management of rental housing properties globally. Headquartered in Charleston, South Carolina, Greystar manages and operates over an estimated $200 billion+ of real estate in nearly 200 markets globally including offices throughout the United States, United Kingdom, Europe, Latin America, and the Asia-Pacific region. Greystar is the largest operator of apartments in the United States, managing approximately 713,000 units/beds, and has a robust institutional investment management platform with approximately $37.2 billion of assets under management, including over $16 billion of assets under development. Greystar was founded by Bob Faith in 1993 with the intent to become a provider of world-class service in the rental residential real estate business. To learn more, visit www.greystar.com.

Media contacts:

For Harrison Street:

Nathaniel Garnick/Grace Cartwright

Gasthalter & Co.

(212) 257-4170

For Greystar:

Brittany Jones

media@greystar.com

(843) 576-5753

Read Press Release

October 8, 2020

News
Spring 2021 Semester

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Oct. 8, 2020 University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto shared a video message with the UK community Wednesday, Oct. 7. He discussed reasons for altering the Spring 2021 academic calendar. Please view the video above and read accompanying information below.

Dear Campus Community,

We have officially passed the half-way mark of this semester. Thanks to the good decisions you are making each day to keep our community safe, we remain hopeful about our goal to continue in-person instruction until Nov. 24 and the Thanksgiving Break.

I’m deeply grateful for the sacrifices you have made thus far.

Looking ahead, we recently announced changes to the academic calendar for the spring 2021 semester. We took the same approach toward the spring as we did the fall; the central idea is to keep students on our campus, as much as possible, until the end of the semester in the interest of health and safety.

A complete listing of our revised calendar can be found here: https://www.uky.edu/registrar/spring-2021-semester.  

As always, critically important efforts like these have many sources. Faculty leaders engaged in this process, and the University Senate Council ultimately reviewed and approved the plan. A number of our COVID-19 workstreams provided key input and the plan was reviewed by our Emergency Operations Center.

We believe this adjusted calendar provides the best option for keeping our community safe and well.

Keep updated on our COVID-19 response here: https://www.uky.edu/coronavirus/.

Eli Capilouto

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August 28, 2020

News
Historic Enrollment, Retention Rates for UK

By Jay Blanton Aug. 28, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 28, 2020) — The University of Kentucky has reached a historic level for enrollment and retention rates — an indication of the institution’s growing academic reputation and as a place where students succeed at high levels, according to preliminary figures released Friday.

This fall, UK has more than 31,000 students enrolled for the first time ever at 31,057, a nearly 2% increase over last year, preliminary figures show. Also, preliminary retention figures — the percentage of students who return for their second year — is at 86.4%, nearly 1.5 percentage points higher than last academic year and about 5 percentage points higher than in just Fall 2016.

“The numbers are an important indication of where we are as a first-choice academic institution,” said UK President Eli Capilouto. “Students and families — even in a time of so much anxiety and uncertainty — are choosing the University of Kentucky because we place students and their success at the center of everything that we do. A college education will be even more important in the future, as our economy changes, requiring more skills and more nimbleness. That’s what an education at UK provides — the critical thinking capacity and toolkit of skills needed to succeed in a world where change is the only real constant.”

Preliminary figures will become final in October when UK passes its census date and reports figures to the state. Some highlights of the preliminary enrollment figures released Friday, following add/drop for Fall 2020 classes, include:

  • UK’s preliminary enrollment of 31,057 is up from 30,545 last year.
  • Retention rates have increased steadily for five years, a number that signals the movement of graduation rates, the most important indicator of student success. UK now is at an all-time high for six-year graduation rates, according to last year’s figure of 66.1%.
  • UK is more diverse than at any time in its more than 155-year history. About 2,100 (nearly 7%) of students are Black, up more than 7% from last year, according to preliminary figures. Hispanic or Latino students now comprise about 5% of the student body with about 1,600 students, up more than 10% over last year.
  • The first-year class for Fall 2020 is right at 5,000 students (4,961), nearly 500 more than what UK was projecting this summer as it prepared for potential economic shocks due to the COVID-19 pandemic. That figure is down about 7% from last year’s record first-year enrollment, likely an indication of economic uncertainty and concerns, UK officials said.
  • The percentage of Black and Hispanic or Latino students in the first-year class increased slightly — 7.2% among Blacks for this year compared to 7.0% last year; 6.7% for Hispanic and Latino students compared to 6.5% last year.

While the enrollment numbers reflect the university’s growing academic reputation, they do not provide any substantive budget relief for the institution, officials said. UK has expended millions of dollars to ensure preparedness and safety in response to the global pandemic and to continue to ensure affordability and access.

For example, the University of Kentucky this fall capped tuition and mandatory fees for all full-time undergraduate students regardless of how many in-class or online classes a student is taking. UK officials estimate the change will cost the university about $5 million in lost tuition revenue.

“Given the uncertain environment in which we find ourselves, these numbers underscore the distinctive educational experience we provide for all our students — undergraduates seeking to find meaning and purpose and graduate students embarking on deep analysis and study in specific fields,” Capilouto said. “The numbers show our promise and potential for service. But we are not satisfied. We must continue to grow and position UK to thrive as we emerge from this crisis — stronger, more diverse and accepting and poised to provide the education our Commonwealth needs from us as the University of, for and with Kentucky.”

For more information, you can view these slides.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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August 24, 2020

Press Release
University of Kentucky Launches Bond Investor Relations Transparency Initiative

University of Kentucky Launches Bond Investor Relations Transparency Initiative

New website UKYBonds.com to be used to attract investors

Lexington, KY – Aug. 24, 2020 — The University of Kentucky officially launched its new investor relations (IR) website, www.UKYBonds.com, today as part of its enhanced transparency and outreach efforts to inform and attract potential investors to the university’s bond program. The open-access website will allow investors across Kentucky as well as the country to access the university’s key financial and operating data much more efficiently as well as stay informed on projects and initiatives at UK. 

The new IR website is free to all investors and is powered by BondLink, a financial technology company that has set the standard for investor transparency across the $4 trillion municipal bond market. BondLink has partnered with the Commonwealth of Kentucky on its investor engagement, as well as the Louisville and Jefferson County Metropolitan Sewer District. BondLink powers the IR websites of other major public universities, including the University of California, the University of Texas and the University of Connecticut.

“We are always looking for ways to be more transparent with the investor community about our finances and capital program,” said UK Treasurer Penny Cox. “Using new, digital channels to market our bonds and reach new investors will lead to more demand over time. That efficiency and savings will allow us to make more infrastructure improvements across the university.”

“We are proud to work with the University of Kentucky to reach investors online and through digital channels,” said Colin MacNaught, BondLink’s CEO and co-founder. “With more and more of the bond market moving online every day, issuers like UK recognize how critical it is to provide financial data much more efficiently to investors.”

To visit the University of Kentucky’s new IR website or to sign up for future notifications or alerts, please visit the website here. 

About University of Kentucky

The University of Kentucky is a public, land-grant university dedicated to improving people's lives through excellence in education, research and creative work, service and health care. As Kentucky's flagship institution, the university plays a critical leadership role by promoting diversity, inclusion, economic development and human well-being.

The University of Kentucky:

  • Facilitates learning, informed by scholarship and research;
  • Expands knowledge through research, scholarship and creative activity; and
  • Serves as a global community by disseminating, sharing and applying knowledge.

The university plays a critical leadership role for the Commonwealth of Kentucky by contributing to the economic development and quality of life within Kentucky's borders and beyond. The university nurtures a diverse community characterized by fairness and equal opportunity.

About BondLink

Led by founders Colin MacNaught, CEO, and Carl Query, CTO, BondLink’s cloud-based debt management platform is the $4 trillion municipal bond market’s first fully integrated operating system for public sector CFOs to raise capital from institutional and retail investors. Since the launch of its first debt management platform four years ago, BondLink has expanded its network across more than 30 states, as well as the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Headquartered in Boston, BondLink is backed by top investors, including Franklin Templeton Investments, one of the largest municipal bond fund managers in the country. For more information, please visit www.bondlink.com.

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For more information contact:
Media Contact

Jay Blanton

AVP/Chief Communications Officer

jay.blanton@uky.edu

859-257-6605

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August 13, 2020

News
COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Tested at UK Shows Positive Preclinical Results

By Elizabeth Chapin Aug. 13, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 13, 2020) — PDS Biotechnology, a clinical stage immunotherapy company, has announced positive results from preclinical testing conducted at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, PDS0203. 

PDS0203 stands out among COVID-19 vaccines currently in development because it includes a vaccine technology pioneered by PDS Biotech called Versamune®, which stimulates important parts of the immune system to activate T cells.

Versamune® activates an important immunological signaling pathway known to be essential in the induction of both anti-viral and anti-tumor immune responses. It also more efficient at presenting the disease-associated protein to immunological pathways that activate both CD8 (killer) and CD4 (helper) T cells that can recognize, kill and protect against a specific disease. 

“The most effective vaccines stimulate both antibody and T cells because both of those arms of the immune system are important to eliminate different viral infections,” said Jerry Woodward, a professor of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics who led the preclinical study at UK. “While many of the vaccines out there stimulate a good antibody response, they don’t always activate T cells. That’s one of the key advantages of the Versamune® technology.”

PDS0203 combines Versamune® nanoparticles with a protein recognized by the human immune system that is derived from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. Prototype vaccines were tested at UK based on various recombinant SARS-CoV-2 proteins, including protein constructs created by UK’s Protein Core lab.

In mouse models, PDS0203 showed strong activation of both protective antibodies as well as highly active and potent virus-specific CD8 killer and CD4 helper T cells within 14 days of treatment. PDS Biotech is submitting the findings to a peer-reviewed scientific journal and is expected to advance the PDS0203 vaccine to a phase 1 safety and immunogenicity clinical trial in humans.

To test the antibody arm of the immune response, mice are vaccinated and serum is separated from blood samples and tested for the amount of antibodies that will bind to the protein. To test the T cell arm of the immune response, T cells are isolated from the mice and tested for their ability to directly respond to peptides, or short pieces of protein, which are derived from the SARS-Cov-2 protein. The results have been promising, Woodward says.

“Vaccination with the recombinant proteins including the spike protein alone elicits lower levels of antibody response and almost no T cell response,” Woodward said. “When Versamune® is added, it dramatically increases both the antibody and T cell immune responses.”

PDS Biotech contracts with expert labs like Woodward’s for independent analysis of vaccine efficacy and research in the development of novel cancer therapies and infectious disease vaccines. Woodward’s lab has been working with the company for several years, and recently received funding from the National Institutes of Allergy and Infectious Diseases to complete preclinical development of a Versamune®-based universal influenza vaccine to provide broad protection against multiple strains of the flu virus. This spring, the focus of Woodward’s collaboration with PDS Biotech expanded primarily from cancer to address the COVID-19 pandemic.

Versamune® presents unique potential for a vaccine to provide the level of immune response needed for protection against COVID-19, Woodward says.

“We’re optimistic an effective COVID-19 vaccine will be available relatively soon. There are probably over a hundred companies working on different vaccines and a lot of them are probably going to work," Woodward said. "I believe that the Versamune®-based vaccine due to its mechanism of action, simplicity and preliminary efficacy and human safety data, has excellent potential to be one of the more successful global vaccines.”

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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August 5, 2020

News
UK Creating Multimillion-dollar Research Initiative Around Racial Disparity, Inequity

By Jay Blanton Aug. 5, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 5, 2020) — University of Kentucky President Eli Capilouto on Wednesday announced a five-year, $10 million commitment to sponsor UK research focused on racial disparities and inequity across broad areas, ranging from health to the historical foundations of systemic racism.

The proposed research initiative, which will require approval from the University Senate, represents a historic commitment by UK into racial disparities and equity. The initiative comes as UK has launched a comprehensive effort, involving hundreds of members of the campus community, aimed at creating a more diverse, equitable and inclusive university. Read more about that effort here: https://www.uky.edu/president/diversity-equity-and-inclusion.

“We are a research institution. A critical part of our mission is finding solutions to the issues that challenge our state and our world,” Capilouto said. “Systemic racism over generations has inarguably impacted health and life expectancy, economic and financial standing, the educational attainment and success of Black people and persons of color over centuries. What we bring to the table is a world-class research institution with scholars and scientists who can work between and among disciplines to find answers to the most intractable of problems and what is fundamentally the issue that has simultaneously shaped and scarred a nation.”

Specifically, Capilouto has asked UK Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis to designate the _UNIT_ed in racial _E_quity (UNITE) Research Initiative as a Research Priority Area — one of now seven such research programs across the campus.

The other six research priority areas include: cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity, energy, neuroscience and substance use disorders. You can read more about research priority areas here: https://www.research.uky.edu/research-priorities-initiative.

The idea behind the program, created in 2014 at the direction of the UK Board of Trustees, was to invest in existing university strengths in selected research focus areas that “benefit and enrich the lives of the citizens of the Commonwealth and beyond.”

In short, Cassis said the idea is to foster existing or emerging areas of research strength at UK and leverage strategic investments from the institution to promote competitiveness for external funding, augment scholarship and economic development, and have a defined impact on a problem of relevance to Kentucky and beyond.  

Designating UNITE as a Research Priority Area will bring together the university’s brightest scholars and scientists across the campus toward this institution-wide research priority, and importantly, provide investment to support collaborative research that enables change, Cassis said.

Assistant Vice President for Research in Diversity and Inclusion Danelle Stevens-Watkins, who is also director of Graduate Studies in the UK College of Education, has agreed to lead the UNITE Research Priority Area. The executive committee will include a diverse representation of faculty from several colleges across the university. Staff and students will also have opportunities to participate in UNITE initiatives.

“UK’s investment in racial equity research is exciting. The UNITE Research Priority Area will synergize research centering racial equity to promote efforts that will have a sustainable impact,” Stevens-Watkins said. “We are seeking to amplify programs of research to enhance attractiveness to extramural funding sources, elevate scholarly activity, and give voice to our communities.”

The initial focus of UNITE research will be social and racial injustice, health disparities that are influenced by race, and promotion of health equity across races, ethnicity and gender. Further, an important purpose of the UNITE Research Priority Area is to coalesce research across campus to harness the full power of UK intellectual capital to promote diversity and inclusion.

Collectively, the UNITE Research Priority Area enables researchers to speak with a uniform voice for research in this area, encourage broad-based participation by faculty, staff and students, increase scholarly activity and extramural funding, and most importantly, develop evidence-based approaches for change.

UNITE activities might include, but are not limited to, providing peer-reviewed seed funding for pilot studies, assessing and disseminating best practices for hiring and retention of a diverse faculty and students, developing a research day/symposia, and the creation of valuable common-use resources that augment overall research in this area.

Capilouto and Cassis will each commit $500,000 of university funds to this initiative for a total funding commitment of $1 million annually for five years. Participating colleges also will each contribute $1 million annually for five years for a $10 million total.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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August 5, 2020

News
BLOG: Record-breaking Grants & Contracts Power UK Innovation in 2020

By Vice President for Research Lisa Cassis Aug. 5, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (Aug. 5, 2020) -- For the first time in University of Kentucky (UK) history, faculty received $429.2 million in competitive research awards last fiscal year. This is a 3% increase from FY19, which itself was a record-breaking 25% increase from the previous year.

Federal grants and contracts, which are highly competitive, totaled $272.2 million, 63.4% of UK’s total awards in FY20. Federal awards increased by 13% overall, with notable increases in the following agencies: 

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) +3%
  • Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), non-NIH Agencies +38%
  • Department of Energy +21%
  • Department of Defense +266%
  • Department of Education +38%
  • NASA +30%
  • National Science Foundation (NSF) +9.7%

This growth includes continued funding for the $87 million HEALing Communities in Kentucky award from the NIH National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, to reduce opioid-related overdose deaths by 40 percent in three years. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the HEALing Communities team fast-tracked naloxone distribution to Kentucky jails to reach soon-to-be released inmates, whom research shows are at increased risk of overdose.

The tenacity and persistence of UK researchers, many of whom saw substantial disruptions to their research efforts from March to June 2020, yielded new grants and contracts totaling $8.7 million to address the COVID-19 pandemic. From membrane-based face masks to capture and inactivate the virus on contact, to special antibodies made by alpacas that could help us understand the novel coronavirus and potentially develop treatments to protect people from infection, UK investigators are using their unparalleled expertise and creativity to address this pandemic. 

In total for FY20, UK successfully competed for 1,710 grants and contracts, submitted by 771 researchers to more than 580 funding agencies.

Many of our colleges saw significant research funding increases: 

  • Gatton College of Business & Economics +37%
  • College of Health Sciences +43%
  • College of Nursing +46%
  • College of Pharmacy +36%
  • College of Public Health +26%
  • College of Social Work +125%

The sheer volume of research activity, and the success of our researchers to garner funding for their impactful and innovative studies, speaks to the significance of the research mission. We are empowering our faculty, staff and students to effectively compete for funding for their best and brightest ideas. Now more than ever, the power of research to improve our future is evident. Research is what will get us out of this pandemic, and research is the key to improving lives in Kentucky and beyond.

To learn more about the innovative research happening across campus, visit research.uky.edu/news.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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July 31, 2020

News
University of Kentucky Announces UK Health Corps Support Team

The University of Kentucky’s newly developed Health Corps will serve as the support hub for accessing services, information and referrals related to COVID-19 for students, faculty, staff this fall semester.

Organized by Student and Academic Life (SAL), Health Corps is driven by a collaborative group of university leaders spanning University Health Service (UHS), Facilities ManagementPublic Relations and Strategic CommunicationsMarketing and Brand StrategyAcademic and Student AffairsStudent Government Association (SGA), Human ResourcesInformation Technology Services (ITS), College of Public HealthSmart CampusFaculty AdvancementEnvironmental Health and Safety, and Institutional Research, Analytics and Decision Support.

Major projects that UK Health Corps is managing for the fall semester include: 

· Health and wellness symptom screening for all students, faculty and staff.

· Student testing.

· Consultation and testing or referrals to resources for faculty and staff.

· Wellness Stations: These will be located around campus to provide masks, disinfectant and other resources as needed and as available. These wellness stations will also be located at the front desk of every residence hall.

· Contact Tracer and Case Manager: Members of the UK Health Corps include trained contact tracers and case managers. Following CDC guidelines, the contact tracers and case managers will work directly with all students and employees who have tested positive and will provide them with the support and resources needed for recovery.

· Providing information about masks and personal protective equipment (PPE).

· Distributing Wellness Kits to every student: These include hand sanitizer, wipes, masks and additional items.

· Collaborating with campus partners to communicate about key issues including increased cleaning and sanitation practices as well as newly created outdoor locations for gatherings and events.

For any questions related to COVID-19 on main campus, please email UK Health Corps at  healthcorps@uky.edu or call at 859-218-SAFE(7233).

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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July 28, 2020

News
UK HealthCare Ranks Top in Ky., Cancer Care Ranks 29th Nationally in U.S. News & World Report

By Allison Perry July 28, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 28, 2020) – For the fifth consecutive year, the University of Kentucky Albert B. Chandler Hospital at UK HealthCare has been named the No. 1 hospital in Kentucky and the Bluegrass Region by the 2020-2021 Best Hospitals rankings and ratings from U.S. News & World Report.

For the fourth straight year, the University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center has earned a top 50 national ranking for cancer care, this year climbing to No. 29.

Additionally, five adult specialties at UK HealthCare were ranked as high-performing: Gastroenterology and GI Surgery, Geriatrics, Nephrology, Orthopedics and Urology. Seven common adult procedures and conditions also received a high-performing designation:  Aortic Valve Surgery, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Colon Cancer Surgery, Heart Bypass Surgery, Heart Failure, Hip Replacement and Lung Cancer Surgery.

“This has been a challenging year, to put it mildly. But in these times, it’s more important than ever that Kentuckians with complex health problems have a medical center they can come to for best treatment options possible,” said Dr. Mark F. Newman, UK executive vice president for health affairs. “To have received this honor now for the fifth consecutive year shows that not only is UK HealthCare the best in Kentucky, we are the best for Kentucky.”

While the UK Markey Cancer Center has been designated as “high performing” for many years prior to cracking the top 50, this year’s ranking of No. 29 in cancer care is the highest to date. In addition to its recognitions from U.S. News & World Report, Markey has been a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center since 2013, the only one in Kentucky and one of just 71 in the country.

“With Kentucky still holding the unfortunate ranking of being No. 1 in overall cancer incidence and mortality, nowhere in the country is it more important for patients to have access to the best possible cancer care,” said Dr. Mark Evers, director of the UK Markey Cancer Center. “But we at Markey seeing positive changes on that front. We are treating and saving more patients than ever before. This latest ranking is further evidence of how we are making progress toward our goal of conquering cancer in the Commonwealth.”

The annual Best Hospitals rankings and ratings, now in their 31st year, are designed to assist patients and their doctors in making informed decisions about where to receive care for challenging health conditions or for common elective procedures.

“At UK HealthCare, we stand ready to help with any medical situation or illness, regardless of its complexity,” said Colleen H. Swartz, vice president for operations at UK HealthCare. “If you live in Kentucky, there is a good chance you or a loved one will need UK HealthCare at some point in time, whether it’s for cancer treatment, trauma, premature babies or any number of medical problems. We take that responsibility very seriously.”

For the 2020-21 rankings and ratings, U.S. News evaluated more than 4,500 medical centers nationwide in 16 specialties, 10 procedures and conditions. In the 16 specialty areas, 134 hospitals were ranked in at least one specialty. In rankings by state and metro area, U.S. News recognized best regional hospitals based on high performing rankings across multiple areas of care.

The U.S. News Best Hospitals methodologies in most areas of care are based largely on objective measures such as risk-adjusted survival and discharge-to-home rates, volume, and quality of nursing, among other care-related indicators.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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July 27, 2020

News
UK Part of Nationally Unique Partnership to Commercialize Tech Innovations

By Crystal Staley July 27, 2020

FRANKFORT, Ky. (July 27, 2020)  Gov. Andy Beshear announced Friday, July 24, the creation of Kentucky Commercialization Ventures (KCV), a new public-private partnership unique in the U.S. that aims to develop academic innovations into job-creating tech companies.

“We all want to grow Kentucky’s tech sector and create the high-paying, knowledge-based jobs that follow. A big part of doing so is turning Kentucky’s own academic research and development capabilities into commercially viable products and startups,” the governor said. “By partnering to create Kentucky Commercialization Ventures, we will provide the infrastructure to commercialize our own best ideas, build the commonwealth’s tech industry and distinguish Kentucky as a national model in innovation.”

KCV brings together the University of Kentucky and University of Louisville with the Kentucky Science and Technology Corp. (KSTC) and KY Innovation, the state’s office for entrepreneurial and small business support. Under recently signed contracts, Kentucky this fiscal year will pay KSTC $755,000 and over the next two fiscal years $200,000 to each of UofL’s and UK’s research foundations.

The partnership leverages UK and UofL’s commercialization offices, KSTC’s history of managing innovation programs and KY Innovation’s statewide entrepreneurship resources.

KCV also partners with Eastern Kentucky University, Western Kentucky University, Northern Kentucky University, Kentucky State University, Morehead State University, Murray State University and the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. No other state’s commercialization program combines the strength of all its public higher education institutions. That makes KCV unique and better positioned to compete for federal grants that support forward-thinking companies and entrepreneurs.

KCV and its team of commercialization experts will work with innovators at these institutions to provide resources to develop marketable products, services and businesses from research findings and intellectual property. As well, they will assist with intellectual property protection, licensing of products and services, and creating connections with industry partners.  

“This collaboration will be pivotal in building Kentucky’s future economy,” said David Brock, operations director for KY Innovation within the Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development. “KCV provides the tools and expertise to launch tech startups and grow new jobs. Success here will lead to future attraction of researchers, innovators, students and research dollars.”

KCV will be led by an executive director, and staff will include an intellectual property director — both to be named at a later date — based at KSTC in Lexington. The partnership will include two program managers — located at UK and UofL — working directly with inventors at institutions statewide. Each university will also dedicate a faculty or administration champion to work directly with faculty, staff and students. KCV partners will also provide entrepreneurial and immersive student experiences in the innovation and commercialization process.

KSTC brings decades of experience working with university researchers, entrepreneurs and startups to help them develop and commercialize their ideas. KSTC President Terry Samuel said the partnership will breathe new life into the entrepreneurial landscape statewide.

“KCV will energize collaboration and commercialization of ideas and inventions from and between our state universities,” Samuel said.

UK President Eli Capilouto said the partnership reinforces the university’s commitment to entrepreneurship and innovation.

“The entrepreneurial spirit at the University of Kentucky makes us the heartbeat of the state’s economy,” Capilouto said. “Kentucky Commercialization Ventures empowers us to work collaboratively with our sister institutions and strengthen our state’s economic development pipeline. This venture underscores our commitment to transform the creative research and development on our campus into tangible solutions benefiting our communities.”

UofL President Neeli Bendapudi said KCV will concentrate the university’s expertise in areas that could change the future economy.

“The University of Louisville has long been a leader in driving innovative, research-backed technologies to the marketplace,” Bendapudi said. “Through this new venture, we can extend our vast proven experience, knowledge and success to institutions around the Commonwealth, working with them to accelerate economic development and the commercialization of technologies that could save lives and improve the way we live and work.”

Aaron Thompson, president of the Council on Postsecondary Education, commended everyone involved for creating the partnership.

“Kentucky colleges and universities are some of the largest economic engines in the Commonwealth, and campuses are eager to unite their resources and expertise in support of entrepreneurs,” Thompson said. “While this partnership will focus on developing and commercializing new products and services, it will also galvanize our state’s economy by encouraging some of our best and brightest to remain here as they build businesses. I want to thank Governor Beshear, Kentucky Cabinet for Economic Development Secretary Larry Hayes and the many leaders from education, business and technology who are spearheading this project with vision and innovation.”

Connect with KCV by visiting KYInnovation.com/KCV. Information on Kentucky’s economic development efforts and programs is available at www.CED.ky.gov. Fans of the cabinet can also join the discussion at www.facebook.com/CEDkygov, on Twitter @CEDkygov and on LinkedIn.

Read about other key updates, actions and information from Gov. Beshear and his administration at governor.ky.govkycovid19.ky.gov and the Governor’s official social media accounts on FacebookTwitter and YouTube.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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July 22, 2020

News
UK Receives CARES Act Funding to Support Economic Recovery

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 22, 2020) — The University of Kentucky has been awarded $300,000 from the U.S. Economic Development Administration (EDA) to support entrepreneurs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The funding — made available by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act — was announced by U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnel (R-KY).

To date, UK has received more than $68 million from the CARES Act, including funding for UK HealthCare, the College of Nursing and the Center for Excellence in Rural Health.  

“The CARES Act is providing needed resources to help combat the COVID-19 pandemic. This federal funding will help UK provide technical assistance to the local workforce as it leads Kentucky’s economic recovery,” McConnell said. “As the only congressional leader not from California or New York, I’m constantly looking to provide for middle America — especially Kentucky. I’m proud of the work UK is doing to help those impacted by the coronavirus crisis.”

“The Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship is very pleased to be selected for this award and grateful for Senator McConnell’s support,” Warren Nash, director of the Von Allmen Center for Entrepreneurship (VACE) in the Gatton College of Business and Economics, added. “We anticipate these funds will give VACE additional resources to assist entrepreneurs and small startups impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

So far, the CARES Act has resulted in a $12 billion impact for Kentucky.

VACE aims to strengthen the Commonwealth’s economy by providing education, networking opportunities, resources and tools for startups and early stage businesses. More information about the center's mission can be found online.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

Read Article

July 20, 2020

News
UK Campus Earns Gold Designation From American College of Sports Medicine

By Beth GoinsRyan Girves, and Meg Mills July 20, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 20, 2020) — Concrete walking paths meander through the University of Kentucky landscape, while bike racks dot the architecture of building fronts. Passing through campus, one might see people zooming along on skateboards, rollerblades or bikes, or jogging past pedestrians. At the impressive new student center, tall windows in one section reveal a large space reserved for exercise. 

These details, visible at a glance, are just the beginning. Health initiatives woven throughout life on the UK campus for students and employees led UK to be one of only 77 institutions in the world to be recognized as a gold campus by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Exercise is Medicine® initiative in June.

Through a leadership team made of health care providers, faculty, staff, fitness professionals and students, UK became an Exercise is Medicine® campus this year. Carrie Davidson, an exercise specialist for UK Human Resources and manager of the MoveWell fitness program on campus, served as the committee advisor and will soon co-chair the national ACSM committee. She is a graduate of the UK College of Education doctoral program in health promotion.

Beyond health promotion on campus, as well as events and educational activities, the initiative includes measuring physical activity as a vital sign in health care, with referral to a qualified fitness professional when needed. This means that in addition to checking the usual signs, such as blood pressure, heart rate and weight, patients are asked about physical activity as a measure of overall wellness.

This process has been in place in the student clinic for some time, and recently the committee and UK Health and Wellness implemented a pilot program to include physical activity as a vital sign in the UK HealthCare Women’s Health Clinic. The MoveWell fitness program served as the referral source.

During check ups at the clinic, health care providers ask patients whether they get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week. Those who say no are referred to UK Health and Wellness for a series of three appointments.

“The pilot has been very successful,” Davidson said. “There was a statistically significant increase in the number of minutes per week of exercise in the Women’s Health Clinic patients, so this was exactly what we wanted — for people to increase their amount of physical activity.”

Rosie Lanphere, assistant professor in the Department of Kinesiology and Health Promotion in the College of Education, will serve as the advisor to the UK committee beginning this fall.

“We have worked for more than a year on this, and I am thrilled to see it come to fruition,” Lanphere said.

A number of UK employees worked on the initiative, along with several students including UK Campus Fitness Director Casey Gilvin, Kinesiology and Health Promotion (KHP) lecturer Jennifer McMullen, UK HealthCare physician Kimberly Kaiser and KHP alumnus. UK exercise specialist Ryan Mason and nurse Karalee Mlack worked with KHP students Zach Lyons, Anna Zeek, Elizabeth Meston, Amanda Zoeller and biology major Amity Lumpp.

Davidson said student involvement has a number of benefits.

“The students helped to gather all the activities, events, and promotions to be able to register our campus and apply for recognition,” Davidson said. “They help to promote physical activity and become ambassadors of sorts for health in their areas on the student side of things. We are hoping to expand this partnership with students in the future.”

“We are thrilled to recognize these campuses’ commitment to make movement a part of daily campus culture and give students the tools to cultivate physical activity habits that will benefit them throughout their lives,” said Robyn Stuhr, vice president of Exercise is Medicine. “These campus programs are nurturing future leaders who will advance a key tenet of Exercise is Medicine — making physical activity assessment and promotion a standard in health care.”

For more information about health and wellness initiatives on campus, visit www.uky.edu/hr/wellness for faculty and staff and https://ukhealthcare.uky.edu/university-health-service/health-education for students.

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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July 17, 2020

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A Collaboration in UK’s Cybersecurity Efforts: Joint Services Operation Center Publishes Annual Report

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 17, 2020) — “We remain diligent in our commitment to the university community to ensure a safe and efficient network environment. Establishing the Joint Services Operations Center (JSOC) at the University of Kentucky is a step in the right direction,” said Brian T. Nichols, chief information officer, UK Information Technology Services.

The JSOC was established, as a pilot project, in December 2017 as a collaboration between university and UK HealthCare IT leadership. Over the last 10 years, the technological landscape at UK has grown exponentially. During this time, more than $3 billion was spent on new infrastructure, making UK a complex, digitally robust organization. Today, JSOC’s mission is to provide real-time monitoring of the university’s technology to support the diverse infrastructure across the university and the Commonwealth.

"Information technology is becoming more and more foundational to the business operations of a health care organization," said Cecilia Page, chief information officer for UK HealthCare. "The 24/7 proactive support provided through this type of initiative is paramount to our delivery of high-quality patient care."

While the effort remains a pilot project, the JSOC team, composed of Information Technology Services and UK HealthCare Information Technology staff, monitors university systems and data across the Commonwealth to provide real-time status updates and detects potential technology incidents for a fast, proactive response. The systems they monitor consist of 149,406 network ports, comprising UK’s network which has an average of 90,000 customers daily. The team mitigates issues before the university community notices anything has happened.

“The opportunity to work with knowledgeable colleagues on top of such a diverse infrastructure has been invaluable,” Miles Fortner, a network specialist at the Joint Services Operation Center, said.

The JSOC is staffed by three university IT team members and three UK HealthCare IT members with various backgrounds and expertise in customer service incident handling, network infrastructure performance monitoring, and diagnostic tools process improvement.

The JSOC continues its mission of providing persistent monitoring 24/7, responding proactively, and enabling exceptional performance through defined policies and procedures. For more information about the JSOC, review the 2019 JSOC Annual Report here.

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July 13, 2020

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UK Tuition, Mandatory Fees Capped for Fall 2020 to Ensure Fairness, Consistency

By Jay Blanton July 13, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (July 10, 2020)  The University of Kentucky this fall will cap tuition and mandatory fees for all full-time undergraduate students regardless of how many in-class or online classes a student takes.

For many students, the result will be a reduction in tuition this fall of several hundred, if not thousands, of dollars. The change was announced today by UK President Eli Capilouto as the university prepares to restart in-class instruction in August for the Fall 2020 semester.

The first day of undergraduate instruction will be Aug. 17.

“We want to do everything possible for students and families to ensure that they can take full advantage of the distinctive educational experience we provide at the University of Kentucky,” Capilouto said. “Particularly as we return to in-class instruction, while still grappling with a global pandemic, it’s critical that our tuition pricing reflects fairness, consistency and a commitment to access and affordability. That’s what this pricing move represents.”

Specifically, for the Fall 2020 semester, tuition and mandatory fees will be capped at $6,242 for full-time undergraduate resident students and $15,647 for nonresident students irrespective of how many courses a student takes in-class, online or hybrid (a combination of face-to-face and online).

In the wake of COVID-19, more and more classes are being offered online, meaning that many undergraduate students would pay higher tuition and mandatory fees than they would with more in-class options. As a result, Capilouto said that for the fall semester, it is important to establish a cap on tuition to ensure fairness and affordability.

UK officials estimate the change will cost the university about $5 million in lost tuition revenue. The university will evaluate whether to continue capping tuition for the Spring 2021 semester.

The potential savings for many students are significant. For example, a full-time Kentucky undergraduate student taking 12 hours of courses face-to-face and three hours online would normally pay $7,937 in total tuition and mandatory fees.

With the cap this fall, the same student would pay $6,242 for the same mix of courses — a savings of almost $1,700.  The university will continue to assess a $10 per credit hour Distance Learning Fee for all courses offered through distance learning such as fully online, hybrid, and off-campus to fund related costs.

The UK Board of Trustees last month approved a tuition increase for resident students this fall of 1% and 2% for nonresident students. The resident rate reflects the lowest increase in more than 35 years.

This year, UK is providing financial aid of about $150 million — nearly triple what UK offered in 2011 at the beginning of Capilouto’s tenure.

“Tuition and fees should be affordable and reflect the available options,” Capilouto said. “Given the pandemic, we are adjusting our pricing strategy for the fall semester due to limited options.”

The University of Kentucky is increasingly the first choice for students, faculty and staff to pursue their passions and their professional goals. In the last two years, Forbes has named UK among the best employers for diversity, and INSIGHT into Diversity recognized us as a Diversity Champion three years running. UK is ranked among the top 30 campuses in the nation for LGBTQ* inclusion and safety. UK has been judged a “Great College to Work for" two years in a row, and UK is among only 22 universities in the country on Forbes' list of "America's Best Employers."  We are ranked among the top 10 percent of public institutions for research expenditures — a tangible symbol of our breadth and depth as a university focused on discovery that changes lives and communities. And our patients know and appreciate the fact that UK HealthCare has been named the state’s top hospital for four straight years. Accolades and honors are great. But they are more important for what they represent: the idea that creating a community of belonging and commitment to excellence is how we honor our mission to be not simply the University of Kentucky, but the University for Kentucky.

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